BSH Ends 2012 with EUR 30M Profit

Business,  01 Mar 2013  / By STA, T. M.

Household appliances company BSH Hišni aparati, a Slovenian subsidiary of German concern BSH Bosch and Siemens, posted EUR 30.1m in net profit last year, on par with profit from 2011. Revenue reached EUR 316.8m and was 1% above plan

Schmidt labelled the company's results as successful despite negative economic conditions. The Nazarje-based plant produced 6.8 million items, maintaining the production volume at 2011 levels (Photo: BSH)
Schmidt labelled the company's results as successful despite negative economic conditions. The Nazarje-based plant produced 6.8 million items, maintaining the production volume at 2011 levels (Photo: BSH)

Schmidt labelled the company's results as successful despite negative economic conditions. The Nazarje-based plant produced 6.8 million items, maintaining the production volume at 2011 levels. Most of the output consists of small household appliances under the Bosch and Siemens brand names. Over 98% of the appliances is exported to foreign markets.

BSH Hišni aparati invested EUR 13.6m into new and existing development projects in 2012, which is 30% above the three-year average. Most of the cash went into the development of high-end coffee makers, which have been the main strategic focus of the company since 2011, Schmidt said.

In the past 20 years, the company spent EUR 178m on investments and development projects and produced 78 million items, multiplying revenues by over 14 times. The company employed 1,236 people at the end of 2012.
 

Tags: Slovenia, Business, economy, BSH, profit, Bosch Siemens, Gerald Schmidt, revenue


Share

send

Comments

Diogenes, 02.03.2013 ob 01:57

This shows what foreign investment and management can do for Slovenia. Our own banks aren't lending to new Slovene entrepreneurs and the incompetent owners and management of larger Slovene companies are sitting on their wealth, most likely tucked away in Switzerland, Cyprus, and the USA, instead of investing it at home to support new enterprises.
Our poorly run banks are unable to collect money loaned out to the oligarchs who bought the companies privatized after independence at knockdown prices and sent any leftover money abroad to personal accounts instead of using it to build the companies. Now they've got theirs and won't return it, so the only hope is foreign investment. But who will invest when our homegrown oligarchs demand their cut?
In theory, the "bad" bank could help correct this situation but the opposition to creating a "bad" bank has effectively blocked that solution.
Raising the VAT just raises the cost of living for the poor and middle classes while the wealthy won't even notice the extra pennies lost to the VAT tax. And they probably buy their luxury items abroad anyway.



Your name

Write your comment:
Comments should be in English language only.
Offensive and off-topic comments will be deleted
Powered by sweet Captcha
Submit your comment